News
The life and death of the Dutch groundwater tax

Marianne Schuerhoff, Hans-Peter Weikard and David Zetland have published their paper «The life and death of the Dutch Groundwater tax» in Water Policy. In the framework of our UNESCO-related groundwater governance meeting in March 2013 we could offer you a pre-release of the paper already. The authors examine the Dutch national groundwater tax — a “win-win-win green tax” that promised to simultaneously provide revenue to government, reduce the relative burden of other taxes on productive behaviour (e.g., income tax), and improve environmental outcomes.

 
Saline seepage in deltaic areas

On 6 December 2013, Perry de Louw will defend his PhD thesis on «Saline seepage in deltaic areas – Preferential groundwater discharge through boils and interactions between thin rainwater lenses and upward saline». More than 50% of world’s population lives in coastal areas and is largely dependent on fresh groundwater resources for domestic, agricultural and industrial purposes. However, in many coastal areas, groundwater is brackish to saline which may pose problems for the sustainable exploitation of fresh groundwater. In low-lying coastal areas that lie below mean sea level, saline groundwater may reach the surface by upward groundwater flow. This process is referred to as «saline seepage» and is the main subject of this PhD thesis.

 
Transboundary water issues can no longer wait

International and regional water and policy experts agreed at Friends of the Earth Middle East’s annual "Good Water Neighbors" conference held in Israel, that transboundary water issues can no longer wait. EcoPeace / Friends of the Earth Middle East's (FoEME) annual "Good Water Neighbors" (GWN) conference, held this year on 17 November 2013 on the occasion of the UN International Year of Water Cooperation, brought together more than 300 Israeli, Palestinian and Jordanian political officials, municipal representatives, water experts, local residents and civil society representatives in Herzliya, Israel last week.

 
From Negotiations to Action on the Ground – Promoting Coherence on Adaptation Across the UNFCCC

Presented by the Netherlands and the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI), a side event on 22 November 2013 at the UNFCCC COP-19 in Warsaw, moderated by Karin Lexén, SIWI, provided an informal platform to explore how increased coherence on adaptation can be achieved and how cooperation between Parties and stakeholders can be strengthened to support enhanced action on adaptation at all levels.

 
SIWI to host the first UNESCO Centre in Sweden

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO, decided during its General Conference in November 2013 to establish a research centre in Sweden with a focus on international water issues. The centre will be run by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) in collaboration with Uppsala University and the University of Gothenburg. With its focus on transboundary water cooperation, the centre will be one of a kind.

 
Eighth meeting of the Working Group on Integrated Water Resources Management

25–26 September 2013, Genève • The main objective of the meeting of the Working Group on Integrated Water Resources Management is to review the implementation of the programme of work for 2013–2015. The eighth meeting of UNECE’s Working Group on Integrated Water Resources Management will be held from 25–26 September 2013 in the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

 
Cooperation for a Water Wise World: Partnerships for Sustainable Development – new report by SIWI

Ahead of the World Water Week in Stockholm, the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) has released its report «Cooperation for a Water Wise World: Partnerships for Sustainable Development». The report will serve as an input to the World Water Week, taking place from 1–6 September 2013, in Stockholm, Sweden, on the theme «Water Cooperation: Building Partnerships».

 
New paths to international environmental cooperation

In 2012, the Government of the Netherlands asked the Advisory Council on International Affairs (AIV) to produce an advisory report on global environmental public goods. The request was prompted by the observation in the Advisory Council on Government Policy’s report «Attached to the World» that the Netherlands is increasingly affected by complex global issues such as climate change, energy and security, and by the interrelations between these issues. The government notes that global environmental public goods are particularly important for global stability and security, as well as sustainable economic growth and prosperity. An improved ‘supply’ and regulation of environmental goods – a stable climate, access to energy and resources, an adequate water supply and preservation of biodiversity and ecosystems – are essential for growth and stability in rich countries, emerging middle-income countries and poor countries.

 
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