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Impact of sea level rise on groundwater flow regimes: A sensitivity analysis for the Netherlands

In this thesis (1996), G.H.P. Oude Essink investigates the possible impact of sea-level rise and human activities on vulnerable coastal groundwater flow regimes in the Netherlands for the next millennium. The focus is on the distribution of fresh and saline groundwater, the volumes of freshwater lenses in the dunes and the seepage and salt load to polders. Since groundwater flow is a slow process, the consequences for the next thousand years are considered.

 
Salt Water Intrusion Meetings proceedings now available online

The Salt Water Intrusion Meetings (SWIMs) have been organized since 1968 and have become an important platform for the exchange of knowledge and ideas about saltwater intrusion and coastal hydrogeology. Currently, SWIMs are organised every 2 years, and the venue alternates between a European and a non-European country. The proceedings and abstracts from the 22 meetings held to date form an important scientific legacy and they illustrate the developments in this field over the past 45 years.

 
Conclusions of Zaragoza International UN-Water Conference on Water Cooperation

Mutual trust and understanding the real needs of communities are key factors for successful water cooperation, according to the participants of the International UN-Water Conference on water cooperation which took place from 8 to 10 January 2013 in Zaragoza, Spain. The participants shared a wide range of initiatives, including experiences in rural and urban areas, and cases at country and basin level, to identify lessons learned and key success factors. The need for cooperation was highlighted as critical for sustainable water management.

 
AGU 2012 fall meeting: scientists perspectives on climate change

This is not cool. During the Fall Meeting of AGU, 3–7 December 2012 in San Francisco, videographer Peter Sinclair captured the views of eight scientists representing some of USA’s leading research institutions in a video produced for The Yale Forum.

 
Greater Mekong Atlas of the Environment

The Greater Mekong Subregion is one of the most dynamic regions in the world, witnessing rapid economic growth over the past two decades. Much of this has been fueled by the unsustainable use of its natural resources. While this has led to increased prosperity, it has also created immense pressure on the natural environment, including its rich and unique biodiversity. The Asian Development Bank has produced the Greater Mekong Subregion Atlas of the Environment.

 
Securing water and land in the Tana Basin, Kenya: a resource book for water managers and practitioners

A new manual describes Kenya’s Tana River catchment area and zooms in on what can practically be done in the different parts of the basin to secure land and water. With 800–1,000 km length the Tana River is Kenya’s largest river. A large range of measures can be introduced: bench terraces and tied ridges in the Upper Catchment; retention through sand dams and subsurface dams in the Middle Catchment; flood water management in the Lower Tana; improved agroforestry throughout the area. Much remains to be done – in outscaling successful experiences and introducing new techniques to better secure ecosystems and make use of water buffers.

 
Streamflow Depletion by Wells—Understanding and Managing the Effects of Groundwater Pumping on Streamflow

Groundwater is an important source of water for many human needs, including public supply, agriculture, and industry. With the development of any natural resource, however, adverse consequences may be associated with its use. One of the primary concerns related to the development of groundwater resources is the effect of groundwater pumping on streamflow. An new USGS report summarizes the scientific insights.

 
Easy Like Water

In the Bangla language, ‘easy like water’ translates roughly to 'piece of cake.' The irony is that in Bangladesh, with 160 million people in a country the size of Wisconsin, water poses a relentless threat. With stronger cyclones and accelerating glacier melt upstream, flooding may create 20 million climate refugees by 2050. A documentary film.

 
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